The Lord Marschal of Kernow

Three weeks before the first battle of St. Albans, the Duke of Cornwall sent his best warrior back to Kernow as the Lord Marschal. Word had evidently come to the duke about certain stirrings among the common folk and the need for a respected and stern hand was now apparent. As it was to prove it was a providential move.

Daveth Killiecrew was indeed a warrior of some prowess. At the age of seventeen he is reputed to have slain Wallace of Cragie with a well-placed arrow at the Battle of Sark (1448). He would then go on to fight at Formigny (1450) where he led his small contingent in capturing the French guns. By then a seasoned veteran, he commanded the entire Cornish contingent at the Battle of Castillon (1453) and killed not one but two French captains in single combat.

Had any of these battles been English victories and not the disasters each proved to be, Killiecrew would undoubtedly have gained a peerage. As it was he could not even boast a knighthood. Prior to leaving for Kernow, however, the duke contrived to have the king confer this long-overdue accolade and then confirm him as Lord Marschal of Kernow.

Now age twenty-four, Sir Daveth turned toward home, and in so doing, avoided participating in a fourth defeat. Likely he regretted not being able to fight under the eyes of both the duke and the king, but he was a man with a great sense of duty and purpose and embraced his new role. Little could he know that he was headed to a war like no other!

The following command piece will represent Sir Daveth as I wargame the War of the Orbs:

single base 1a

Sir Daveth is the mounted figure in the center. The caparison on his horse is quartered with the Killiecrew red and yellow and the black chough proper and green field of Kernow. The banner in the background is that of the Lord Marschal with the cross of St. Piran.  His foot retinue wear the Killiecrew colors and his mounted supporters the black and white of Kernow as does the Lord Marschal himself.

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